Sensors & Instrumentation Seminar Programme

Tuesday 26th September

10:00-10:45

The new IoT opportunity, Sensing-as-a-Service

The new IoT opportunity, Sensing-as-a-Service

Neil Hamilton, VP Business Development at Thingstream

  • IoT is at the top of the Gartner Hype Cycle.  Mobile carriers and other network operators along with IoT platform vendors such as IBM, Microsoft and Amazon are all ‘talking up’ IoT to stamp their position in the market; however, in reality, all IoT solutions are based around a measurement of some kind, a change in temperature, an increase in electricity demand, a decrease in rainfall – without sensors, the $25bn industry wouldn’t be viable. 

    Myriad’s mission is to reduce the cost of getting sensor based devices into the field, giving more kudos and margin to the sensor manufacturers, many of which position themselves on the edge of the ecosystem when they should be the driving force.

11:00-11:45

Building the UK's new focal point for sensor technologies

Keynote speaker from Sensor City – TBC

12:00-12:45

What you should know before building a DAQ system

What you should know before building a DAQ system

Erik van Hilten, Senior Technical Marketing Engineer at National Instruments

  • When building a DAQ system, you need to consider many elements to ensure a successful test. Explore key topics such as cabling, signal conditioning, noise immunity, and overall accuracy when building your DAQ system from end to end.

14:00-14:45

A brief history and future of instrumentation data

A brief history and future of instrumentation data

Sebastian Amos, Sector Head at Gambica Association

  • Instrumentation is a collective term for measuring instruments used for indicating, measuring and recording physical quantities. Forming the basis of process control, instruments continue to develop their capability, repeatability, accuracy, reliability and cost.

    Throughout the first and second industrial revolutions of mechanical and mass production, instrumentation and its development were a key supporting technology.

    Instrument developments at the sensor level have engaged both the mechanical and chemical sectors, whilst the transmission of values has made use of the electronic industries forging the advancements through the third industrial revolution, production using electronics and computers.

    As we enter the period dubbed the fourth industrial revolution, AI, Big Data and more, this presentation follows the impact of instrumentation within the first three revolutions and examines how the instrumentation industry is engaging in a world of digital data and forensic analytics to meet the challenges of this fourth industrial revolution.

15:00-15:45

Vibration facility and their work with the ESA

Vibration facility and their work with the ESA

Charlie Jarvis, National Physical Laboratory (NPL)’s expert in Mechanics, Optics, Engineering Physics

  • The talk will introduce the motivation for the development of the Microvibration Measurement System by NPL for ESA. The system operating principles, instrumentation, mechanical design, uncertainty evaluation approach and preliminary results will be detailed.

Wednesday 27th September

10:00-10:45

Fibre optic sensors – applications and solutions

Fibre optic sensors – applications and solutions

Andrew Ramage, Director of Business Development at Techni Measure

  • Fibre optic sensors are unique in their complete immunity to radio frequency and electromagnetic interference, since the medium of data transmission is light. This allows measurements to be taken in environments that “traditional” wired voltage output or current loop sensors cannot easily operate, as well as allowing very long cable runs and long-term installations. Various types of fibre optic sensors have been developed for measuring parameters such as temperature, strain, displacement & pressure that operate via different fundamental principles.

    The seminar will explore a number of measurement applications particularly suited to the use of fibre optic sensors, explain the basic operating principles of the various types of fibre optic sensors available on the market today and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each type as relevant to the applications.

     

11:00-11:45

Build your own sensor

Build your own sensor

Dave Boylan, Area Sales Manager at IST AG

  • Gas flow sensor elements utilise heat transfer principles to determine the flow velocity. As gas flow passes across the sensor, heat is carried from the sensor to the medium. As flow increases, so does the amount of heat that is transferred. By knowing the heat transfer characteristic, the flow rate can be determined from the amount of voltage compensation needed to maintain a constant temperature differential.

    Key requirements such as response time and dynamic range for sensor adaptation are addressed in the paper. Design of channels and housings are discussed for best-in-class implementation. Markets addressed are HVAC-building automation, Smoke/CO alarms, medical, device monitoring, and compressed air/gas billing.

12:00-12:45

Accuracy 101: Understanding data acquisition system accuracy

Accuracy 101: Understanding data acquisition system accuracy

Erik van Hilten, Senior Technical Marketing Engineer at National Instruments

  • NI thoroughly tests and documents DAQ hardware performance to help you maximize the overall accuracy of your system. Learn how to understand and calculate your DAQ system accuracy using NI or third-party hardware by factoring in absolute accuracy of the hardware, gain error, offset error, INL error, noise uncertainty, and calibration considerations.

14:00-14:45

Developing FDI and its place within IIoT

Developing FDI and its place within IIoT

Richard Barnes, Chairman at FieldComm Group c/o Emerson Automation Solutions

  • Field Device Interface provides the future for a unified presentation of smart field device parameters. How this development will provide users additional benefits and potential business improvement possibilities.